As part of the City's Heritage and Conservation Works Strategy Plan, the heritage-listed Woodloes Homestead will undergo conservation work.

The Homestead’s current 25 year old she-oak shingle roof will be replaced with a short sheet galvanised corrugated iron roof. Other work also includes new gutters, downpipes and improvements to the Homestead’s weather tightness and fire resistance.

Conservation work on Woodloes Homestead is expected to start in December 2018 and finish in January 2019.

FAQs

What is Woodloes Homestead?

Owned by the City of Canning since the 1970s, Woodloes Homestead was built during the period of 1871 to 1874 on the banks of the Canning River. The original owner and architect of the Homestead was Francis Bird – a key figure in the development of the Western Australian timber industry and one of the State’s largest employers.

Why is the Homestead important to the City of Canning?

Woodloes Homestead is understood to be the oldest existing building in Canning. Known as one of the earliest architect designed homes in the Swan River Colony; it has cultural heritage significance and is listed on the State Register of Heritage Places. Woodloes Homestead is a rare example of example of a dwelling constructed by a wealthy Western Australian family in the Victorian era that is largely intact and maintains its connection with the Canning River.

Where is Woodloes Homestead located?

Woodloes Homestead is located on Woodloes Street, Cannington.

What work is taking place on the building?

As part of the City’s Heritage and Conservation Works Strategy Plan for Woodloes Homestead, the current 25 year old she-oak shingle roof will be replaced with short sheet galvanised corrugated iron of heritage profile as well as new gutters, downpipes and improvements to the Homestead’s weather tightness and fire resistance.

Why is the work required?

This work will conserve the building fabric of the Woodloes Homestead to prevent further degradation, reduce the risk of water related and fire damage, ensure building longevity and manage on-going maintenance costs.

Why is the roof material changing?

The City is changing the roof cladding on Woodloes Homestead from timber shingles to metal sheet for greater longevity, durability, improved weather proofing, fire resistance and reduced maintenance. Corrugated iron as a roof material was used on Woodloes in the past, so there is historic precedence for this. Photographs from the period show that corrugated iron roofing was used on Woodloes previously from the 1920’s through to the 1970s. The short sheet iron is expected to last twice as long as shingles. Woodloes is located in a designated bushfire prone zone, so the replacement of the roof from timber to metal also significantly reduces the potential of irreversible fire damage.

Is the work approved?

Woodloes Homestead has cultural heritage significance and is listed on the State Register of Heritage Places.

As such, the Heritage Council of WA is a key stakeholder with the legal mandate to advise on and approve works carried out on the Homestead. Another key stakeholder is the Canning Districts Historical Society who open and manage the Homestead on behalf of the Community, and has a vested interest in any works carried out.

After consultation with both key stakeholders, the replacement of the existing timber shingles with corrugated, short length, metal sheets has received the necessary support and approval of both the Heritage Council of WA and the Canning Districts Historical Society-. Support for the proposed material change is based on the Homestead having a long history of being roofed in metal sheet between the 1920’s to the 1970s.

Photographic records of the Homestead will be taken prior to, during, and after the roof replacement work and kept for historical and archival purposes.

When will the work be completed?

Construction on the Homestead is expected to start in December 2018 and finish in January 2019.

Will the Homestead be closed during the works?

The Canning District Historical Society closes Woodloes Homestead over the summer months each year, namely December to February, thereby providing an opportune time to carry out the work.

When will the Homestead open again?

Woodloes Homestead is due to open again in early March 2019.

Who is completing the works?

Architects experienced in heritage conservation works are advising and assisting the City of Canning in the design and oversight of the works. Contractors experienced in heritage building work will complete construction on behalf of the City.

How much is the works going to cost?

The anticipated cost of the works is $220,000. This will be fully funded by the City of Canning as the works do not qualify for any grant funding currently available.

Will the conservation works have any traffic implications?

No. The conservation works won’t have any impact on traffic or surrounding roads.

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